hearthstrung

The Treat Ritual: exotic ice creams at Sundaes and Cones

So far our treat rituals have included some delights somewhat off the beaten path – a Japanese tea house, goat’s milk ice cream, vegan soft serve.  Oh, and a variety of superb espressos.  Last week’s post-Dirt Candy treat was just as enjoyable, but perhaps a little more ‘normal’ – insofar as it was just regular old cow’s milk ice cream.  Beyond that, though, I suppose it wasn’t quite like any old trip to the ice cream store.

But I’m getting ahead of myself.  As is my wont, I used the post-work afternoon sun as an opportunity for a lovely outdoor espresso.  Café of the day: MUD.

It was very close by, just a block up E 9th between 1st and 2nd (don’t you love the East Village for that?).  I loved those ceiling-height windows in front with indoor and outdoor benches.

The espresso was pretty great – another lovely one for summer or fall.  Autumn soil on the nose (twigs, dried leaves, etc.), with a bright body of asparagus and lemon, and a lingering finish of roasted summer root vegetables (unsurprising given those delicious golden beet skins I’ve been eating lately).  And, it came in a glass.

C loves that, it’s reminiscent of how they do in Australia.

After that nice rest stop, it was off to Sundaes and Cones, just a few blocks away on E 10th between 3rd and 4th.

Such a large store!  And an ice cream store at that!  Very impressive.  I love the wide, windowed storefront and the copious white chairs and benches they have outside.

They really don’t skimp on the scoops either.

Tasting time yielded many favourites, though eventually I settled on the avocado and the taro root.  There was something alluringly delicate about both these flavours, and their unlikeliness, combined with their beautiful soft colours, led me to believe I had a winning combination for that particular afternoon.

I’m a fan of taro root – it reminds me of Japan, where they use things like sweet potato and beans in desserts.  I love the subtle sweetness, and the earthy qualities, and the colour.  The avocado was a perfect complement – similarly subtle, slightly fruity, with that unique depth and fatty, nutty mystery that make avocados just so gosh-darn great.

But what really set this ice cream apart, I think, was the texture.  It was just so creamy, without being heavy at all.  It was like licking a cloud that had been condensed to a solid.  It practically slid onto one’s tongue.  But neither did it drip.  It was remarkable.

I read a couple stories from Dubliners while gliding through ice cream bliss.  I particularly enjoyed ‘After the Race’.

I totally do that thing where you push the ice cream down with your tongue as you go so that it goes down into the cone and you still have ice cream in the cone as you bite the delicious waffle.  That’s common, right?

Lisa loves this part of the cone – where it gets down to mini size and there’s really only one or two bites left.  I’ve been in the habit lately, this is for her.

All in all, very solid.  I’ll be back – so many more flavours to try!

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This entry was published on Saturday, July 23, 2011 at 11:10 pm. It’s filed under adventures and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

4 thoughts on “The Treat Ritual: exotic ice creams at Sundaes and Cones

  1. you’ll be back next time with me hopefully!

  2. we’ll have to do an ice cream tour.

  3. I read this while eating a vanilla Drumstick. On the label it says “Artificially Flavored Vanilla with Extra Thick Chocolatey Coating FROZEN DAIRY DESSERT CONE.” Oh, the irony.

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